The Earth's climate is warming

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For[edit | edit source]

  • There is a scientific consensus that climate change is occurring
  • The Earth's surface temperature is rising
  • The Earth's oceans are warming
  • Glaciers are retreating almost everywhere around the world
  • According to NASA, "Most of the warming occurred in the past 35 years, with 16 of the 17 warmest years on record occurring since 2001."[1]
  • According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) "Evidence for a warming world comes from multiple independent climate indicators, from high up in the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. They include changes in surface, atmospheric and oceanic temperatures; glaciers; snow cover; sea ice; sea level and atmospheric water vapour. Scientists from all over the world have independently verified this evidence many times." [2]
  • According to the EPA, "The U.S. Global Change Research Program, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have each independently concluded that warming of the climate system in recent decades is "unequivocal." This conclusion is not drawn from any one source of data but is based on multiple lines of evidence, including three worldwide temperature datasets showing nearly identical warming trends as well as numerous other independent indicators of global warming (e.g., rising sea levels, shrinking Arctic sea ice)."[3]
  • According to BBC News, "The planet's climate has constantly been changing over geological time. The global average temperature today is about 15C, though geological evidence suggests it has been much higher and lower in the past.

However, the current period of warming is occurring more rapidly than many past events. Scientists are concerned that the natural fluctuation, or variability, is being overtaken by a rapid human-induced warming that has serious implications for the stability of the planet's climate."[4]

See Also[edit | edit source]

Citations[edit | edit source]

  1. "Climate change evidence: How do we know?". Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet. Retrieved 2017-11-14. 
  2. Hartmann, D. L.; Klein Tank, A. M. G.; Rusticucci, M. (2013). "2: Observations: Atmosphere and Surface" (PDF). IPCC WGI AR5 (Report). p. 198. Evidence for a warming world comes from multiple independent climate indicators, from high up in the atmosphere to the depths of the oceans. They include changes in surface, atmospheric and oceanic temperatures; glaciers; snow cover; sea ice; sea level and atmospheric water vapour. Scientists from all over the world have independently verified this evidence many times. 
  3. EPA,OA, US. "Myths vs. Facts: Denial of Petitions for Reconsideration of the Endangerment and Cause or Contribute Findings for Greenhouse Gases under Section 202(a) of the Clean Air Act | US EPA". US EPA. Retrieved 2017-11-14. The U.S. Global Change Research Program, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have each independently concluded that warming of the climate system in recent decades is "unequivocal." This conclusion is not drawn from any one source of data but is based on multiple lines of evidence, including three worldwide temperature datasets showing nearly identical warming trends as well as numerous other independent indicators of global warming (e.g., rising sea levels, shrinking Arctic sea ice). 
  4. BBC News Editors. "What is climate change?", BBC News, United Kingdom, 3 December 2018. Retrieved on 27 March 2019.